Above: Scholar Thomas DeFrantz reads amidst performers Brittany Engel-Adams, Stanley Gambucci, Jeremy Jae Neal, Nicholas Leichter and Netta Yerushalmy in Revelations: The Afterlives of Slavery, the third installment in Yerushalmy's Paramodernities.  Paramodernities is part of the 2018 Bridge Project. Photo credit: Paula Lobo.

 

2018 BRIDGE PROJECT
Paramodernities #1, #3 and #4
A Series of Dance Experiments Led by Artist Netta Yerushalmy

Netta Yerushalmy's West Coast Premiere
February 22-25, 2018
ODC Theater

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW

PERFORMANCE

The 2018 Bridge Project, in association with ODC Theater, presents Netta Yerushalmy's Paramodernitiesa multidisciplinary series of lecture-performances or dance-experiments generated through deconstructions of landmark modern choreographies.These deconstructions are performed alongside contributions by scholars and writers who situate these iconic works  within the larger project of Modernism. Exploring foundational tenants of modern discourse such as sovereignty, race, feminism, and nihilism, Paramodernities includes public discussions as inseparable parts of each installment. 

February 23 and 24th, Yerushalmy will present installments devoted to Vaslav Nijinsky, Alvin Ailey, and Merce Cunningham at ODC Theater. The installment that explores Vaslav Nijinky is called The Work of Dance in the Age of Sacred Lives, and features scholar David Kishik and Yerushalmy herself.  Revelations: the Afterlives of Slavery is the installment sprouting from the work of Alvin Ailey, and features scholar Thomas DeFrantz and performers Oluwadamilare Ayorinde, Brittany Engel-Adams, Stanley Gambucci, Nicholas Leichter, and Yerushalmy. Material from five different works by Merce Cunningham will be combined to form an “inter-body event” performed by Brittany Engel-Adams and Marc Crousillat, who are joined on stage by a panel of local scholars and artists (lineup to be announced). 

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW

PUBLIC WORKSHOP: Deconstructing Dance History: A Studio Practice
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 25,  12-5 PM
TO REGISTER email programs@hopemohr.org
Sliding scale: $75-$125

This workshop is about meeting ourselves a new, through re-embodying what I refer to as the "geological" layers that comprise our trained moving bodies. 

 In the first half of the workshop we'll spend time studying and dancing movements that we in some sense know, that we take for granted, or that we deem "old school" and naive. Like trying on a period-costume and allowing it to change our behavior, we'll reverently (if temporarily) commit ourselves to the physicality, meaning, and ideologies that these movements hold.

The second half of the workshop will be about manipulating that information with a variety of irreverent methods. These deconstructive methods aim at generating new perspectives for workshop-participants about our individual and shared past-present-future moving bodies.

ABOUT NETTA YERUSHALMY

Based in New York City since 2000, Netta was most recently named a Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants-For-Artists recipient. She has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, Jerome Robbins BogliascoFoundation, New York Foundation for the Arts, Extended Life (LMCC), as well as an Artist In Residence at Baryshnikov Arts Center, Jacob’s Pillow, Watermill Center, Movement Research, DiP resident (Gibney), Djerassi, ICI Berlin, and TribecaPerforming Arts Center. Her work was presented by American Dance Festival, Joyce Theater, New York Live Arts, Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, La Mama, Danspace Project, HarknessDance Festival, + many others; In Israel by Curtain-Up, Jerusalem International Dance Week, International-Exposure; In Europe by HAU Hebbel am Ufer (Berlin), Centre National de la Danse (Paris), Institute for Cultural Inquiry (Berlin), and International Solo-Dance-Theater Festival (Stuttgart). Commissions for repertory companies: Ririe Woodbury (SLC, '15), Zenon (Minneapolis, '12,'14), Same Planet Different World (Chicago, '13), Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts ('11). Netta has worked with students at the Juilliard School, Rutgers University, Alvin Ailey, Tisch School of the Arts, University of Austin, University of Utah, James Madison University, Kelim Choreographic Center (Israel), University of the Arts (Philadelphia). Netta danced with Doug Varone and Dancers ’07-'12. She also performed with Nancy Bannon, Mark Jarecki, Metropolitan Opera Ballet. She currently dances with Joanna Kotze, and Pam Tanowitz.

To register for the workshop, email programs@hopemohr.org

 

ABOUT THE BRIDGE PROJECT

"The Bridge Project is a small ray of hope in a troubled world. Creating spaces for debate, dissent, connection and collaboration, the Bridge Project offers a model for how to build arts community."     
 --Jack Halberstam (Columbia University Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Author of The Queer Art of Failure, Featured Participant in 2017 Bridge Project: Radical Movements)

"The Bridge Project reimagines and even celebrates conversation as a form that brings us body to body."
-- Maxe Crandall and Selby Schwartz, Movement Research, December 14, 2017 (reviewing the 2017 Bridge Project, Radical Movements: Gender and Politics in Performance)

 

The Bridge Project approaches curating as a form of community organizing to facilitate cultural conversations that cross discipline, geography, and perspective.  

The purposes of the Bridge Project are:

  • Create an intellectual commons for and among artists;
  • Promote alliances and relationships among artists;
  • Facilitate relationships among artists and activists in the struggle toward equity.

Bridge Project programming includes:

  • Teaching Artist Series (brings master teachers to the Bay Area)
  • Community Engagement Residency (provides sanctuary and creative opportunity for artists who self-identify as marginalized)
  • Multidisciplinary Performance
 

New Program: Community Engagement Residency

2017 Community Engagement Resident Artist Julie Tolentino

2017 Community Engagement Resident Artist
Julie Tolentino

 
 
 

Multidisciplinary Performance

Bridge Project 2017 RADICAL MOVEMENTS: GENDER AND POLITICS IN PERFORMANCE Image of Julie Tolentino Photo credit Aldo Hernandez Courtesy of the Artist  

Bridge Project 2017
RADICAL MOVEMENTS:
GENDER AND POLITICS IN PERFORMANCE

Image of Julie Tolentino
Photo credit Aldo Hernandez
Courtesy of the Artist
 

Bridge Project 2015: Rewriting Dance an exploration of the intersection between language and choreographic thinking featuring Deborah Hay, Jeanine Durning and Alva Noe Photo of Jeanine Durning by Ian Douglas

Bridge Project 2015:
Rewriting Dance

an exploration of the intersection between language and choreographic thinking featuring Deborah Hay, Jeanine Durning and Alva Noe

Photo of Jeanine Durning
by Ian Douglas

 
 
Bridge Project 2016: Ten Artists Respond to Locus a multidisciplinary exchange inspired by dance pioneer Trisha Brown Photo of Trisha Brown by Lois Greenfield

Bridge Project 2016:
Ten Artists Respond to Locus

a multidisciplinary exchange inspired by dance pioneer Trisha Brown

Photo of Trisha Brown
by Lois Greenfield

Bridge Project 2014: Have We Come a Long Way, Baby? an intergenerational celebration of female postmodern choreographers featuring Anna Halprin, Simone Forti, and Lucinda Childs Photo of Anna Halprin by Margo Moritz

Bridge Project 2014:
Have We Come a Long Way, Baby?

an intergenerational celebration of female postmodern choreographers featuring Anna Halprin, Simone Forti, and Lucinda Childs

Photo of Anna Halprin
by Margo Moritz

Teaching Artist Series

2017 Spring Teaching Artist Miguel Gutierrez: Making Work Photo of Miguel Gutierrez by Ian Douglas

2017 Spring Teaching Artist
Miguel Gutierrez:
 Making Work

Photo of Miguel Gutierrez
by Ian Douglas

2014 Spring Teaching Artist Stephanie Skura: Open Source Forms  

2014 Spring Teaching Artist
Stephanie Skura:
 Open Source Forms

 

2016 Spring Teaching Artist Chrysa Parkinson:  Performers and Authorship  

2016 Spring Teaching Artist
Chrysa Parkinson:
 
Performers and Authorship

 

2013 Spring Teaching Artist Susan Rethorst: The Choreographic Mind at Work

2013 Spring Teaching Artist
Susan Rethorst:
 The Choreographic Mind at Work

 

CURRENT AND PAST BRIDGE PROJECT ARTISTS & SPEAKERS

Netta Yerushalmy (2018) Paramodernities
Peacock Rebellion (2017) Radical Movements: Gender and Politics in Performance
Maryam Rostami (2017) Radical Movements: Gender and Politics in Performance
Monique Jenkinson (2017) Radical Movements: Gender and Politics in Performance
Judith Butler (2017) Radical Movements: Gender and Politics in Performance
boychild (2017) Radical Movements: Gender and Politics in Performance
Jack Halberstam (2017) Radical Movements: Gender and Politics in Performance
Becca Blackwell (2017) They, Themself, and Schmerm
Julie Tolentino (2017 Community Engagement Resident Artist)  
Miguel Gutierrez (2017 Teaching Artist) Making Work
Diane Madden/Trisha Brown Dance Company (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Gerald Casel (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Xandra Ibarra (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Gregory Dawson (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Larry Arrington (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Peiling Kao (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Amy Foote (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Cheryl Leonard (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Affinity Project (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Frances Richard (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Tracy Taylor Grubbs (2016)  Ten Artists Respond to Locus  
Chrysa Parkinson (2016 Teaching Artist) Performers and Authorship
Deborah Hay (2015) A Continuity of Discontinuity
Alva Noe (2015) See me if you can!
Michele Steinwald (2015) Reorganizing Ourselves
Jeanine Durning (2015 Teaching Artist) inging & what we do when we do the thing we do before we know what we are doing
Maurya Kerr (2015) Talk the Walk
Jenny Stulberg/Lauren Simpson (2015) Still Life No. 4
Maureen Whiting (2015) Talk the Walk
Megan Nicely (2015) Talk the Walk
Simone Forti (2014) News Animation
Anna Halprin (2014) The Courtesan and The Crone
Lucinda Childs (2014) Carnation (performed by Hope Mohr)
Stephanie Skura (2014 Teaching Artist) Open Source Forms
Susan Rethorst (2013 Teaching Artist) Behold Bold Sam Dog
Dusan Tynek (2012) Transparent Walls and Base Pairs
Liz Gerring (2011) She Dreams in Code
Molissa Fenley (2010) Mass Balance
Yvonne Rainer (2010) Trio A (performed by Hope Mohr and Robbie Cook)

 

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT THE BRIDGE PROJECT

"The Bridge Project is a small ray of hope in a troubled world. Creating spaces for debate, dissent, connection and collaboration, the Bridge Project offers a model for how to build arts community."     
--Jack Halberstam (participant in 2017 Bridge Project)

"Ordinary Practices of the Radical Body will go down in my personal history as the greatest lec-dem of all time. Picture it: two queer icons alone together on the dance floor, step-touching their way through theories of gender, embodied identity, and precarity. Their dancing demonstrated that the philosopher has a body and the dancer has a mind—in other words, everyone is a bodymind—and the toll dancing and scholarly labor takes on the body was made visible by their talk about it."
-Sima Belmar, In Practice: Body Nerds: Judith Butler and Monique Jenkinson, In Dance, January 1, 2018 (reviewing the 2017 Bridge Project)

"The evening served up an accessible and stimulating blend of sophisticated queer theory and radical politics alongside personal anecdote and a modest but sincere lovefest across the disciplinary divide...There was an unspoken but palpable sense of disorientation, along with the slightly giddy wonder at what might happen, when two mutually admiring representatives of two mutually exclusive worlds (art and academe, for short) let their respective guards down." 
-- Robert Avila, "A philosopher and a drag queen meet on a dance floor...", 48 Hills, December 7, 2017 (reviewing the 2017 Bridge Project)

"For several years Hope Mohr's Bridge Project has connected history an the present moment, art and intellectual probing."
-- "His/Her/Their Moves", Dance Magazine, November, 2017

"Hope Mohr is perennially inquisitive. The intellectual curiosity evident in her choreography extends to the intriguing, post-modern dance experiments she orchestrates each year under the imprint of the Bridge Project."
-- Carla Escoda, "Fall Dance Season Will Bring Political Fury to Bay Area Stages"KQED Arts, August 22, 2017

“HMD’s Bridge Project fills a critical gap in the artistic and intellectual life of the Bay Area dance community by honoring the past and giving context to the present through its remarkable annual series of guest artists and events.” 
-- Stanford University's Dr. Janice Ross

"[The Bridge Project] is an artist’s-curated initiative that opens the thinking processes that go into creation of work."
--Critic Rita Felciano, KQED Arts, "The Do List," November 6, 2015

“[The Bridge Project goes] beyond [Mohr's] work as choreographer and artistic director to lead processes often executed by performing arts presenters and venues.”
-- Julie Potter, ODC Theater Director

“Rather than creating a bridge that reinforced the distinctions between disciplines, the Bridge Project offered a view of an inclusive community—one in which complementary, rather than disparate, pursuits benefited each other and those in attendance.”
--Joe Ferguson, "Science, Philosophy and Performance Art in 'The [2015] Bridge Project,'"  SciArt in America, Dec. 28, 2015

"[HMD's Bridge Project presents]...intelligent and excellent evenings of dance. The Bay Area owes her."
--Rita Felciano, " Dance View Times, Vol. 31, No.4, Autumn 2014

"Hope Mohr Dance and Bridge Project create absolutely vital and much-needed discourse for Dance and Performance in the Bay Area and beyond. To have my artistic work included as an integral part of that discourse has been and will continue to be deeply valuable to me."  -Monique Jenkinson, Featured Artist in 2017 Bridge Project, Radical Movements

"I see the Bridge Project as a counter-balance to th[e] propensity towards isolation [in the Bay Area]. It keeps us connected and aware of a broader history and larger artistic community.  Its facilitators provide artists with tools and a space to deepen their understanding of their own artistic inclinations and intent. I suspect that this rigor and clarity with respect to intent increases our potential to engage in meaningful exchanges outside our immediate community. " --Karla Quintero, Participant in the 2016 Bridge Project: Ten Artists Respond to Locus

“What the Bridge Project is offering is unparalleled in the Bay Area and deeply important…arts programs are not curated like this anywhere else” --Artist and Workshop Participant Margit Galanter

 

 

 

FUNDING

Funding for the Bridge Project comes from the NEA, San Francisco Arts Commission, California Arts Council, San Francisco's Grants for the Arts, the Kenneth Rainin Foundation, the Sakana Foundation, and generous individual donors.